5 Tips for Your Brand’s Walmart Content Strategy

Walmart Content Strategy
Walmart Content Strategy

A strong content strategy is crucial to any brand’s marketplace presence. In the past, we’ve shared many posts about content on Amazon. But today, we’re here to share our point of view and strategic direction for content on Walmart. Because, while the value of content on either channel is the same, Walmart has its nuances to consider. Continue reading for quick tips to leverage in your brand’s Walmart content strategy.

1. Don’t Forget the Shelf Description 

On Amazon, the search results are always changing as the channel tests new tactics and features. And, in part, how well a brand ranks is determined by the quality of its product detail page optimization. 

The same is true on Walmart.com, but there is one nuance brands should be aware of, the shelf description. A product’s shelf description displays within the list view of Walmart’s search results.

Walmart Content Strategy
Walmart Content Strategy

Shelf descriptions provide brands an opportunity to leverage their strongest keywords. Usually, one or two will suffice and trigger Walmart’s algorithm.

2. Invest in Enhanced Content if Possible 

Not so long ago, on the Marketplace Strategy blog, we answered the question; Are Amazon A+ Pages worth your brand’s time? In short, the answer is yes, and the sentiment applies to Walmart as well. 

Below the fold on a product detail page, shoppers will find a product’s version of an Amazon A+ Page. This feature allows brands to include video, charts, additional images, and more. It’s a chance to reiterate to a shopper why they should purchase your product.

3. Understand Content Ownership 

An interesting caveat to content on Walmart is ownership of product detail pages. Most of the time brands will have complete control of their listings. However, this changes if a product loses the Buy Box. 

We’ve discussed losing the Buy Box on Amazon before, and most of the same rules apply. But, it’s important to note, pricing plays a larger role in content ownership on Walmart.

4. Consider Length Recommendations 

As alluded to before, Walmart has length limitations for aspects of a product detail page. But, when given a maximum character count, this doesn’t mean the set number of characters is required. Sometimes it makes sense to use fewer characters for the sake of user experience. 

Nevertheless, brands are tasked with effectively balancing keywords and generic terms within limited space. Below are a few of the most common length recommendations. 

  • Title: Between 50 and 75 characters 
  • Bullets/ Key Features: Between 5 and 7 bullets that are between 50 and 75 characters  
  • Short Description: Between 500 and 1,000 characters
  • Long Description: Between 250 and 300 words 
  • Shelf Description: 200 character limit with best results found when using between 50 and 75 characters  

5. Diversify Product Image Libraries 

Finally, arguably one of the most impactful elements of a product detail page on any marketplace, the image library. All images used to showcase a product should be high-quality. And, on Walmart, the main image needs to have a white background, similar to Amazon. 

At MPS, we often use Cambridge style images for our Amazon and Walmart clients. They’ve proved to increase clicks and conversions, even on mobile devices. We also recommend using a number of image types including products in a setting, lifestyle images, and typographic images. Not only does this help engage shoppers, but using a variety of image types will help educate consumers and lead to a purchase decision.

When using a holistic approach to any marketplace, a strong content strategy is absolutely necessary. Content and creative not only affects a product and brand’s performance on the channel, but it can make or break a brand’s reputation among shoppers and competitors.

If you could use the support of a strategic partner, schedule a free consultation. And, as always, we’re here to answer any questions about your marketplace strategy. 

Walmart Content Strategy
Hannah West

Hannah West